Tobacco Education

A Year's Worth of Tar

This graphic, sealed exhibit, containing a pack of cigarettes and cigarette butts submerged in gooey tar, represents the amount of carcinogenic liquid a one-pack-a-day smoker put into his/her lungs over the course of a year.

Consequences of Smoking, 3D Info Board

Detailed boards with hand-painted models clearly showing the consequences of tobacco abuse on our organs. The brief explanations in English are ideal for lessons. In carry-case.

COPD Chart - Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

This colorful anatomical chart displays the signs, symptoms and other useful information of COPD or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Radiographs and illustrations are used to show the anatomy of the disease on this poster.

Drug Dependence Chart

This colorful poster presents a variety of information about dependency on drugs.

Lou-Wheeze

Students get a shocking picture of smoking-related lung damage with this interactive display. Lou-Wheeze has two flexible latex lung models.

Nicotine Dependence Chart

Over 30% of the world's population uses tobacco products, and 90% of that is from cigarettes. The anatomy of nicotine effects the diseases it can cause, including cancer, are detailed on this anatomical poster.

Smoker Model

This small hand-held model actually smokes a cigarette and collects the tar and nicotine on a photo of a real chest X-ray of a lung cancer victim. Stained prints fit into plastic bags, keeping stains intact when they are passed around for closer inspection.

Smokey Sue - “The Dangers of Smoking”

Smokey Sue dramatically demonstrates the quantity of tar collected in the lungs when a single cigarette is smoked. The tar, normally inhaled directly into the lungs, is collected in a transparent tube, and thus shows the quantity of tar which reaches the lungs with each cigarette very clearly.

Smokey Sue Smokes For Two

As Smokey Sue smokes a cigarette, tar collects around the lifelike model of a 7-month-old fetus, graphically showing the pollutants that can reach a developing baby. Jar and fetus are easy to clean.

Tobacco Ingredients Display

The toxic chemicals found in tobacco smoke are more easily remembered by associating them with common - and grossly unappealing - substances

Tobacco Mouth

This hinged model of the teeth, flexible tongue, and oral cavity shows the effects of smokeless tobacco. Mounted on base, supplied with a bottle of simulated tobacco juice.

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